HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

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wax
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Re: HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

Post by wax » Fri May 16, 2008 11:23 pm

ez benski !!!
good to see you on here mate ! hope you enjoy your stay :)
very very nice set up mate :)
catch you on MSN ;)

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usol
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Re: HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

Post by usol » Wed Jan 14, 2009 10:00 pm

I think that the most important thing for any home studio is monitoring.
Most home production suites will be in spare rooms/cupboard under stairs etc and acoustics will be critical.
Whether you're using softsynths and cubase, or a raft of analogue outboard gear, the biggest influence on your final sound will be how you've mixed it.

You will very rarely be able to get a top mixdown using headphones - so don't try.

You need to try and get the tonal characteristics of your stduio correct - if it's too bright get some fabrics in, too bassy get a roll of carpet out. Listen to your favourite tracks in your ideal environment - then listen to them in your studio and take heed of the differences. Standing waves and resonant peaks can massively distort the tone of your recordings. Try to get simple things like the bass/treble levels sounding flat if possible, try to get the room as symmetrical as possible and ensure you monitor from your speaker's sweet spot (it sounds obvious but you'd be surprised!), another common mistake is to have speakers that have too long a throw for the space they're in. You want the place you'll be monitoring from to be where the waves cross from L & R so those huge 15" bins you're using might be ok if you're monitoring from 5 or 6 metres away, but not from 3 feet.

A beautifully produced track made on top flight kit and mastered through beautiful vintage outboard gear might sound great in your studio through your expensive active monitors but sound shite everywhere else if your room ain't right. I would suggest that a relatively modest studio set-up using cheap gear in a good, acoustically designed and compensated room will always give you better mixdowns (and therefore tracks)than expensive kit in a bad room.

With regard to the gear used here are some pointers:

1. Yes vintage analogue gear is expensive, but it is lovely. Even if it doesn't actually sound much better than software, the way it makes you feel is just as important when being creative so if it floats your boat get some in. If you are unsure, don't bother, collectors have made some of the gear very valuable so leave it to the collectors - you can get good virtual stuff from as little as fuck all online. Once you're into it a bit more you will know what classic toys you want (my list is huge!)

2. We (being oldskool fans) are always gonna love the "old ways" whether its Amiga's running octaMED or an Atari St running a snide version of Cubase via an Akai S950.
There's a place for all of this but remember, the time that the gear you made your tune on becomes more important than the actual tune is the time to take a break and get the kettle on.

3. Remember a good tune is good whatever made it - a £300 laptop can do stuff straight out of the box that a ten grand sampler couldn't do twenty years ago so don't worry about your gear too much. The reason old tunes often sound good even though they were made on prehistoric kit (8 bit samples anyone?) is because many of them were mastered properly by people who knew what they were doing (or at least warmed-up a bit by the mastering engineers when they got cut).

4. Much as enthusiasts like myself would hate to admit it - but set up properly the average home computer is currently capable of doing stuff of a quality so close to what I was achieving using hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of Neve mixing desk/OTARI multitracker/Protools and top flight outboard 15 years ago that even sound engineers would struggle to tell the difference.

The basic rule is get some simple gear - make some tunes first, and then decide where you think your studio should go once you hit "the wall" and remember back in the day we didn't have any option - we just used the kit we had available and squeezing ideas out of really limted kit is pretty much how all the classic sounds we know and love were born!

I'm off to polish my valve compressor.... :)

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Re: HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

Post by DazzF » Mon Feb 09, 2009 8:34 pm

Hi,

I'm thinking of getting some monitors,

My head tells me to buy these (as I can afford them) KRK RP 5 G2 - 90 WATT ACTIVE SPEAKERS http://www.htfr.com/more-info/MR272145, But I keep looking at the bigger KRK RP 6 G2 - 140 WATT ACTIVE MONITORS http://www.htfr.com/more-info/MR272136

I don't see much difference apart from the wattage, is this really going to make a big difference when mixing down?

Also, could someone tell me how I should position these in the room, I've read posts saying you need a listening triangle, but what does that really? I can place them about eight feet apart, so should I sit eight feet away from them?

Also in a lot of pictures I see monitors resting on foam, I assume this is to stop the vibation of the bass causing the surface of where the monitor is placed to cause unwanted noise/distortion. This that right? if so can I just use any old foam or do I need to buy something special?

Cheers Dazz

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Re: HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

Post by ske » Wed Mar 25, 2009 7:51 am

usol wrote:I think that the most important thing for any home studio is monitoring.
Most home production suites will be in spare rooms/cupboard under stairs etc and acoustics will be critical.
Whether you're using softsynths and cubase, or a raft of analogue outboard gear, the biggest influence on your final sound will be how you've mixed it.

You will very rarely be able to get a top mixdown using headphones - so don't try.

You need to try and get the tonal characteristics of your stduio correct - if it's too bright get some fabrics in, too bassy get a roll of carpet out. Listen to your favourite tracks in your ideal environment - then listen to them in your studio and take heed of the differences. Standing waves and resonant peaks can massively distort the tone of your recordings. Try to get simple things like the bass/treble levels sounding flat if possible, try to get the room as symmetrical as possible and ensure you monitor from your speaker's sweet spot (it sounds obvious but you'd be surprised!), another common mistake is to have speakers that have too long a throw for the space they're in. You want the place you'll be monitoring from to be where the waves cross from L & R so those huge 15" bins you're using might be ok if you're monitoring from 5 or 6 metres away, but not from 3 feet.

A beautifully produced track made on top flight kit and mastered through beautiful vintage outboard gear might sound great in your studio through your expensive active monitors but sound shite everywhere else if your room ain't right. I would suggest that a relatively modest studio set-up using cheap gear in a good, acoustically designed and compensated room will always give you better mixdowns (and therefore tracks)than expensive kit in a bad room.

With regard to the gear used here are some pointers:

1. Yes vintage analogue gear is expensive, but it is lovely. Even if it doesn't actually sound much better than software, the way it makes you feel is just as important when being creative so if it floats your boat get some in. If you are unsure, don't bother, collectors have made some of the gear very valuable so leave it to the collectors - you can get good virtual stuff from as little as fuck all online. Once you're into it a bit more you will know what classic toys you want (my list is huge!)

2. We (being oldskool fans) are always gonna love the "old ways" whether its Amiga's running octaMED or an Atari St running a snide version of Cubase via an Akai S950.
There's a place for all of this but remember, the time that the gear you made your tune on becomes more important than the actual tune is the time to take a break and get the kettle on.

3. Remember a good tune is good whatever made it - a £300 laptop can do stuff straight out of the box that a ten grand sampler couldn't do twenty years ago so don't worry about your gear too much. The reason old tunes often sound good even though they were made on prehistoric kit (8 bit samples anyone?) is because many of them were mastered properly by people who knew what they were doing (or at least warmed-up a bit by the mastering engineers when they got cut).

4. Much as enthusiasts like myself would hate to admit it - but set up properly the average home computer is currently capable of doing stuff of a quality so close to what I was achieving using hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of Neve mixing desk/OTARI multitracker/Protools and top flight outboard 15 years ago that even sound engineers would struggle to tell the difference.

The basic rule is get some simple gear - make some tunes first, and then decide where you think your studio should go once you hit "the wall" and remember back in the day we didn't have any option - we just used the kit we had available and squeezing ideas out of really limted kit is pretty much how all the classic sounds we know and love were born!

I'm off to polish my valve compressor.... :)
A good read that usol and some tips to take on board :)

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Re: HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

Post by J3D » Fri Jul 02, 2010 9:25 pm

Image

Side / Door view !

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Re: HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

Post by Louk » Fri Jun 22, 2012 6:18 pm

Hey guys!

Sorry about digging up an old post but I gave a friend some advice on setting up a studio and this is what I recommended.

- PC: PC with Windows 7, 64 Bits
- Motherboard that can fit 4 slots of ram (my friend is limited to 8 gig)
- RAM: Corsair Vengeance 16 GB : 4 x 4 GB Memory £76
- Behringer Absolute 2031A Monitors
- M-Audio Oxygen 49 Keyboard (3rd Gen)
- M-Audio Fast Track Pro soundcard.
- An external hard drive. (Western Digital 2TB would be ideal)
- If necessary a good graphics card and dual monitors.

Sequencers of Choice are Cubase and Renoise (use both extensively).

That's as brief as I can put it really but this has helped him on his way and out of all the studio setups I have had here and used in collaborations, this is my favourite.

Louk

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Re: HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

Post by dj_gyr8 » Wed Jul 18, 2012 4:17 pm

Hi,

I guess I am lucky enough to have been onboard when we used Atari ST's!

I had always been an analogue and control freak, but a few years ago I just flipped out and got rid of almost everything.

In reality I decided all I need was a MacBook Pro, running all the programs I need, plus the best keyboard and speakers I can afford.

There really is no need for anything else.

The reason why, years ago we had all these bulky bits of expensive kit, is because the computers couldn't do it all - now they can!

Note, I have been lucky enough to build a library of sounds over the years, and it is always nice to go back to some of those 'real' sounds, especially the drums.

Still got some kit for live PA's tho, like my Moogs for analogue sounds and filters, esp for the bass.

1. Get a MacBook Pro
2. Get the programs you NEED (not those you want)
3. Get the best speakers you can afford
4. Get a 4 octave minimum midi keyboard - get the heaviest and most responsive keys you can afford

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Re: HOW TO BUILD YOUR HOME STUDIO

Post by dubplate records » Mon Oct 28, 2013 11:44 pm

Ahh,jus browsed thru this for the first time
here's some pics from inside Sonic Fortress :)
https://www.facebook.com/#!/media/set/? ... 807&type=3

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